Denmark sets several unfortunate COVID-19 records

As fatality count surpasses the 1,000 mark, record highs are reached in positive tests and the number of people hospitalised

Despite the latest COVID-19 restrictions ushered in by the government this week, COVID-19 cases continue to mount nationwide.

That has resulted in a record number of positive cases being registered over the past 24 hours – 4,508 to be exact, according to State Serum Institute figures.

That’s well above the 4,043 registered the previous day and doesn’t include the 1,083 who have tested positive in Falck’s new rapid-test centres.

Moreover, the number of people admitted to hospital over the past day has increased by 130 – yet another record.

However, 78 people have also been discharged, so the net increase of people currently hospitalised for COVID-19-related illnesses is up by 52 to 568 – the highest number since the pandemic started.

Of those hospitalised, 79 are in intensive care and 52 are on respirators. Another 15 people have died, bringing the death toll past the 1,000 mark to 1,007.

READ ALSO: New restrictions in! Denmark closing down significantly over Christmas

You may want to brace yourself
The good news is that 141,172 were tested over the past day, so the percentage of positive tests has remained somewhat stable at 3.19.

According to Jan Pravsgaard Christensen, a professor at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen, the figures are concerning.

“It’s moving in the wrong direction. People should think about what they are doing and do what they can to minimise the spread,” he told TV2 News.

“People should consider not celebrating Christmas normally.”

Christensen said that Denmark was heading towards reaching 5,000 new daily infections before Christmas and it was likely that the country would be in for a long lock down period. 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.