More women becoming pregnant using frozen eggs in Denmark

The health minister, Magnus Heunicke, is jubilant that the figures have increased fourfold to 2,260 over the past six years

In 2019, 2,260 women became pregnant via fertilisation treatment using frozen eggs, according to new figures from the health data authority, Sundhedsdatastyrelsen.

The number is a fourfold increase compared to 2013, when 526 women were fertilsed using the same assisted reproduction technique.

Meanwhile, the success rate has doubled over the past years – a development that pleased the health minister, Magnus Heunicke.

“Fertility treatment is difficult – physically and psychologically – and it’s easy to understand how much the desire to have a child can fill,” said Heunicke.

“So there is good reason to be happy that considerably more people undergoing fertility treatment become parents today compared to just six years ago.”

Last year, the government expanded the time limit on storing eggs in connection with fertility treatment and illness from five years up until women turn 46 – the age limit for fertility treatment in Denmark.

READ ALSO: Fertility failings: Close to one in nine new-borns conceived via artificial insemination last year

Higher pregnancy rate, less multiple-gestation
According to
Sundhedsdatastyrelsen, about 30 percent of fertility treatments involving frozen eggs lead to pregnancy – up from 16.7 percent in 2013.

The probability of getting twins or more children has also decreased significantly from 14.3 percent in 2013 to 2.3 percent in 2019.

Frozen eggs can be used for new attempts if initial efforts fail or if a second child is desired down the road. 

It therefore helps women avoid having to go through hormonal treatment and egg retrieval procedures a second time.

A total of 39,974 fertility treatments were undertaken in Denmark in 2019, leading to 7,465 pregnancies and an estimated 7,795 children.

Read the entire report here (in Danish).





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