Allergy alert! Birch pollen season has arrived

Pollen levels to reach moderate levels already tomorrow as allergy sufferers face another bout of itchy and sneezy woe

It would undoubtedly be preferable to hay fever sufferers if the headline above was part of some elaborate April Fool’s Day ploy.

But alas, it is not.

The birch pollen season has indeed commenced in Denmark, with low levels recorded today and moderate levels projected for tomorrow.

“This year, we spotted the first birch pollen earlier than usual and have thus monitored the development of birch pollen in our traps,” said Mathilde Kloster, a biologist and head of Astma-Allergi Danmark’s pollen count unit.

Kloster said that the warm weather over the past few days have led to an increase in pollen in the air.

Birch pollen allergy impacts some 500,000 people in Denmark every year – just under 9 percent of the population.

Hay fever symptoms range from itchy eyes and sneezing to influencing the respiratory system – not great considering the ongoing COVID-19 situation.

Some people also experience cross allergies with certain types of food – especially certain fruit, vegies and nuts.

And while it’s impossible to completely avoid the pollen, there is help to be found.

For one, you can stay on top of the pollen levels in Denmark by downloading Astma-Allergi Danmark’s app here.

Check out a few other helpful tips in the fact box below.

Or call Astma-Allergi Danmark and consult with an expert on 4343 4299 from Monday to Friday from 09:00-12:00 and from 16:00-18:00 on Wednesdays.





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