Leaked from the negotiating table to TV2: Travelling restrictions to be relaxed soon

Foreign holidays will reportedly be possible from May 6 providing you have been vaccinated

The right to freely leave and re-enter the country, without the hassle of isolating upon your return, might return quicker than many of us had expected, according to an exclusive TV2 report this morning.

The news service has come into possession of detailed plans to phase back travelling over the next six weeks.

The “leaked draft agreement”, which is also described as a “preliminary draft”, has been sourced from negotiating tables in Parliament, and the government is expected to continue discussing the plans this afternoon.

Starting from April 21
From April 21, according to the plans, it will be possible for Danes to visit their properties (providing they are in remote locations) in the Nordic countries, without the need to isolate when they get there or when they return. The same will also apply to business travellers.

From the same date,  isolation requirements for entrants from ‘yellow countries’ will be relaxed and the list of valid purposes required to travel into Denmark will be expanded.

And then in early and mid-May …
From May 6, completely vaccinated Danes and foreigners from yellow and orange EU countries will be able to travel in and out of Denmark. 

And then from mid-May, providing everyone in Denmark over the age of 50 have been vaccinated by that point, valid reasons will no longer be needed for incoming travellers from orange countries, along with countries outside the EU that meet specified criteria.

However, testing and isolation requirements will remain in place unless entrants are vaccinated. 





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