Denmark and Slovakia strengthen COVID-19 bonds

Slovakian President Zuzana Caputová visits State Serum Institute with the health minister as part of trip to Copenhagen

Slovakian President Zuzana Caputová is in Copenhagen today in an effort to strengthen bonds with Denmark.

As part of her two-day visit, Caputová visited the State Serum Institute (SSI) with the health minister, Magnus Heunicke, to hear how Denmark has handled the COVID-19 pandemic.

“When Slovakia endured a significant increase in COVID-19 cases this winter and was suddenly among the hardest hit in Europe, Denmark sent us doctors and nurses to help us through the crisis. We are very grateful for that,” said Caputová.

More specifically, Denmark dispatched a team of four doctors and 12 nurses to a hospital in Banská Bystrica, where they were stationed for three weeks.

READ ALSO: Denmark sends health team to COVID-19-embattled Slovakia 

Strong bond since 1994
SSI boss Henrik Ullum underscored the importance of co-operation being the way forward in the battle against COVID-19 – particularly by sharing knowledge and working hard.

During her trip to Denmark, Caputová will also visit PM Mette Frederiksen and Crown Prince Frederik. 

“The close bonds between Denmark and Slovakia go back to 1994 when Her Majesty Queen Margrethe visited Slovakia after the country gained independence. That bond was then further strengthened when Slovakia joined the EU in 2004,” said Heunicke.

“Now the COVID-19 epidemic has brought us even closer together through our co-ordinated efforts in the EU relating to fighting the pandemic.”





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.