Government to introduce new restrictions as corona cases mount

PM Mette Frederiksen announced this evening that school kids were heading home, face masks are back and nightlife will be curbed

The record number of daily COVID-19 cases and the new omicron mutation spreading with haste has spurred the government into action.

PM Mette Frederiksen said that she was confident that things wouldn’t get as bad as last year due to the high percentage of people being vaccinated, but new measures will still be required.

From December 15, all school kids (from classes 0-10) will be sent home until at least January 4 in a move that Frederiksen referred to as an “extended Christmas holiday”.

“It’s our big hope that you get your kids vaccinated in December, and as quickly as possible,” she said.

From December 10, nightlife venues will not be able to open, as well as venues hosting concerts and other such events with more than 50 people in attendance.

Furthermore, facemasks will be required when standing in bars and restaurants.

READ ALSO: Over 7,000 new infections amid a surge in Omicron cases

Stay home and get vaxxed!
The PM encouraged the private and public sectors to work from home as much as possible and companies are encouraged to cancel their Christmas parties.

The government also urged people who have booked their third vaccination jab to check to see if they could get it earlier as there are vacant vaccine times available. Check more than once per day, if possible.

“Days are more important than weeks, when it comes to revaccination,” said Søren Brostrøm, the head of the Sundhedsstyrelsen health authority.

The government also announced that those impacted by the restrictions, such as bars, nightclubs, event venues and distributors, will be compensated financially.





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