Third jab bookings available to all over-40s who got their second no later than July 28

Initial analysis suggests booster improves the odds of avoiding symptoms from 50 to 75 percent

Last week, it was announced that all over-40s could get their third corona vaccination jab by the end of December, providing they had their second more than three months ago.

But yesterday it emerged that the cutoff point is four and a half months: so a second vaccination jab no later than July 28.

Søren Brostrøm, the head of the Sundhedsstyrelsen health authority, confirmed the news, explaining it made sense in light of the encroaching Omicron variant and rapid rise in the infection rate in December.

The European Medical Association last week reduced the necessary waiting time between the second and third jabs from six to three months.

Wait is over an hour
There are currently 93,000+ people in the queue at vacciner.dk waiting to get a jab. The wait is over an hour.

DR will tell you that all of these people are Danes, but fear not, as TV2 confirms they are members of the public.

And no doubt, many of them are internationals hopeful of getting the booster before heading to their homeland for Christmas.

Some 1.201 million people in Denmark have so far had their third jab.

Improves the odds
Initial analysis in the UK has demonstrated that Omicron is more resistant to the vaccines than previous variants, but that a third jab makes a big difference.

For example, for those who have had the Pfizer, only a quarter will experience symptoms if they have had a third jab.

For those who have only had two jabs, the likelihood of symptoms is more like 50 percent.





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