Danish pension firm pressures airline over worker rights

AkademikerPension has threatened to withdraw millions in investment from Hungarian budget carrier Wizz Air over treatment of workers

Danish pension firm AkademikerPension (AP) is unhappy about how Hungarian budget airline Wizz Air has treated its employees. 

The issue has reached the point where AP will withdraw millions of kroner in investment in the airline, often referred to as the ‘Ryanair of eastern Europe’.

“We are concerned about Wizz Air’s obvious disregard of basic worker rights, including the company’s lacking reaction to our request to meet and discuss our concerns as a shareholder,” said Jen Munch Holst, the head of AP.

Holst went on to threaten to pull AP’s investment from the airline if the company continues to avoid dialogue and formally refuses to recognise unions.

READ ALSO: Grounded forever: Danish airline goes bust

December 20 deadline
According to AP, Wizz Air’s CEO
József Varadi stated in 2020 that the airline is averse to unions because they kill business.

Aside from AP, 12 other investors are also considering their investment due to the worker rights issue. 

“At the end of the day, respecting worker rights is about passenger safety. There is mounting evidence that workers are prevented from joining unions or sacked when they do. This is completely unacceptable,” said Holst.

AP has given Wizz Air until December 20 to reach out and set up a meeting. 





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