Holiday miracle? White Christmas on the cards after all

Latest forecast suggests that there will be snow or sleet across the country, but will it be cold enough to stick around?

Just about a week ago meteorologists indicated that there was just as 8 percent chance of a white Christmas in Denmark this year. 

But as is often the case here, the winds have changed and now it’s looking a whole lot better for those yearning for some snowmen and a cheeky sleigh ride on Christmas Eve.

“It will begin already on December 23 with snow, sleet and rain predicted for large swaths of the country. However, it hangs in the balance in regards to whether the snow will melt in a couple of plus degrees around Christmas,” said DMI meteorologist Jens Lindskjold.

“In short, the forecast is uncertain and at the moment it’s about 50/50 whether Christmas will be wet or white.”

READ ALSO: Little chance of a white Christmas in Denmark

A rarity in Denmark
To be considered a ‘White Christmas’, there must be at least half a centimeter of snow in 90 percent of the country on the afternoon of December 24. 

A white Christmas has only been recorded 12 times since 1874 – seven times in the 20th century, and twice in the 21st century.

The last time was a back-to-back showing in 2009 and 2010, while the last time it snowed locally was in 2018.





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