Government to ban famous people from gambling ads

Tax minister Jeppe Bruus said his proposal is aimed at reducing the number of children and young people who become gambling addicts

The days of famous people appearing in gambling ads in Denmark look to be numbered. 

The government has made a proposal to ban high-profile individuals like actors and professional athletes from promoting betting and gambling sites. 

“We want a complete ban on using famous people or other authorities, because that’s people who particularly kids and young people look up to,” tax minister, Jeppe Bruus, told TV2 News.

READ ALSO: Danes more prone to betting on sports than fellow Nordics

From Laudrup to Asbæk
The proposal, which will be presented to Parliament today, also seeks to ban gambling ads from airing during sporting events – as well as 15 minutes before and after the events.

Gambling and betting sites have long employed famous people in promotional ads, including former Denmark international Brian Laudrup, actor Pilou Asbæk and comedian Uffe Holm.

“If you speak with the Centre for Gambling Addication [Center for Ludomani], addicts and their loved ones contend that the ads have a significant effect on their development – whether it be children, young people or adults,” said Bruus.

It’s not the first time gambling ads have come under fire from the authorities. 

Recently, a number of municipalities in Denmark have banned them from being used on busses and trains.





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