Millions to see dip in electricity prices 

Servicing 2.5 million customers, Cerius, Radius Elnet and Tre-For all expect to lower their prices in the coming months

Electricity prices have shot up nationwide over the past year thanks to the War in Ukraine and sky-high inflation.

But there could finally be some relief on the horizon – at least for the 2.5 million customers living on the eastern side of Denmark.

Electricity providers Cerius, Radius Elnet and Tre-For – which provide electricity for some 2.5 million people in Zealand and nearby islands – have decided to reduce their tariffs in the near future.

Cerius and Radius Elnet will do so on March 1, while Tre-For is considering following suit.

“It was a difficult decision to increase prices this autumn, but the sudden spike in electricity meant there was no way around it,” Cäthe Juul Bay-Smidt, a spokesperson for Cerius and Radius Elnet, told TV2 News.

“But as we said back then and ever since, we would reduce the prices again as soon as we have seen a long-term tendency to lower electricity prices. We see that now, and that means we have lower costs and can put down prices.”

READ ALSO: Danish homeowners facing high electricity prices as temperatures plummet along with wind speeds

Future remains tenuous
More specifically, the reduction pertains to the price the companies charge for transporting electricity from the source to consumers and maintaining the grid.

Bay-Smidt said it was unsure how long the reduction in price would last.

Radius Elnet service around 1 million homes and companies in the Copenhagen area, as well as north Zealand and parts of mid-Zealand. 

Cerius services customers in northwest, mid and south Zealand, Lolland-Falster and the surrounding islands.

Finally, Tre-For, provides electricity to the Triangle Region of Denmark: Billund, Fredericia, Haderslev, Kolding, Middelfart and Vejle.





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