British and living in Denmark? Last chance for Brexit residency visa

At the end of 2023, the door will close for UK nationals to secure their Withdrawal Agreement residency permit. Read the rules and apply here.

If you’re a UK national who arrived in Denmark before 2021, you can obtain a residence permit under the Withdrawal Agreement.

But the deadline is fast approaching. 31 December 2023 is the last chance to submit an application.

“We were very pleased when the Danish authorities decided to extend the deadline, but this is the last opportunity – otherwise you’ll be applying late and asking for discretion,” cautions the UK Ambassador to Denmark Emma Kate Hopkins.

In jeopardy
The deadline concerns people who have not yet applied for their first residency document – not those who have obtained one already, but who need to extend.

At the UK embassy, Hopkins and her colleagues saw a second wave of applications after the deadline extension.

“We had almost 19,000 on-time applications, but that showed us that there are still some UK nationals in jeopardy,” she says.

Applicants need to specify which category they fall into: employee, student, self-employed, sufficient funds and so on. This can create a road-block for those with an unstable status.

“We are targeting those people who are yet to go through the process. Probably people who are not working in big institutions or companies, who are under the radar, in a more vulnerable category, maybe don’t have access to social media,” explains Hopkins.

The British Embassy is encouraging people to think, not only of themselves, but of anyone in their community who has not secured their Withdrawal Agreement residency.
Read about the requirements and apply here.





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