Political majority behind funding after-hours private child-minding

It can be hard for parents who work odd hours or have changing shifts to co-ordinate everything with their children’s institutions

From July this year, all the municipalities in Denmark will have to offer a combination of institutionalised child minding and economic support for a private child-minder when the institution is closed to parents who can prove that they have odd working hours.

The social and children’s minister, Mai Mercado, thinks that this is an important step towards recognising that families are different and have different needs when it comes to having their children looked after, reports DR Nyheder.

Only a one-off so far, though
However, 10 municipalities already offer this service and it seems as if it is hardly being used, according to the Danish Center for Social Science Research, VIVE.

Only 11 children have used the arrangement over the last 10 years, and in January this year there was only one child taking advantage of it.

These figures do not deter the minister. “If it fits in with the individual family, it is important to that family, so it is much more than just a symbolic gesture,” said Mercado.

“It could also be that people have not been aware of the opportunity to get a place in an institution and a subsidy towards child-minding at home if both parents have odd working hours,” she added.





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