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War in Ukraine summit in Copenhagen this weekend

Western powers will use the meeting as an opportunity to exert pressure on countries that have not yet condemned Russia’s invasion.

As first reported on May 22, Copenhagen will host a summit this weekend where envoys representing world leaders will discuss the War in Ukraine.

According to Berlingske, it will be hosted at the Foreign Ministry, and the respective minister, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, will participate and possibly host.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy expressed the need for such a meeting during  the G7 summit in Japan in May, and the media swiftly identified Copenhagen as the likely host.

One of the main aims of the meeting – it is thought it could be the first of several – will be to exert pressure on countries that have not yet condemned Russia’s invasion.

“India’s foreign minister said very clearly last year in Bratislava that the West’s problems are not the world’s problems,” DIIS senior researcher Flemming Splidsboel told TV2.

“But the West believes this is so big and far-reaching that the countries have to take a stand. You want to push them to do it.”

Finland, for example, recently cut development aid to countries that support Russia.

India, Brazil, South Africa, China and Turkey all represented
According to the Financial Times, the US has played a central role in setting up the meeting – earlier this month US President Joe Biden met Danish PM Mette Frederiksen at the White House.

It is believed Biden will be represented in Copenhagen by his top security adviser, Jake Sullivan.

Representatives from India, Brazil, South Africa, China and Turkey are all expected, reports Berlingske.

“A number of Western countries believe that something must be done now,” commented Splidsboel.

“We need to push on, because we are almost 500 days into the war, Ukraine’s counter-offensive is going a bit hit and miss, and there is no breakthrough.”

It is not thought likely any binding decisions will be made at the first meeting, as the envoys will first report back to their respective governments.





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